Archive | Law

You Now Need A Special Permit To Fly Your Drone in Lebanon

The Lebanese Army announced two days ago that from now on drone owners in Lebanon need to apply for a licence from the Air Force, and they have three months to comply with this requirements. Moreover, a special permit will be needed from the Army Guidance Office each time they want to fly these drones especially around military bases.

I’m not sure how serious is the army going to be about applying this new regulation since they issues a similar memo two years ago but few people seem to have complied with it.

Other countries such as UAE and Kuwait have implemented similar regulation and I believe it’s about time to regulate drone usage in Lebanon, not necessarily everywhere but at least around sensitive locations such as Beirut Airport since it is very close to residential areas and any drone there can disrupt the air traffic just like what happened in Dubai last October.

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The Problem With The New Red Light Cameras in Beirut

The traffic management center in Lebanon recently installed some red light cameras around Beirut in order to enforce traffic laws by automatically photographing people who run red lights or those who stop their cars on red AFTER the white stop bar. In their first tests, they unsurprisingly were able to record a violation every 8 seconds!

However, while the installation of these cameras is just logical in order to ensure the new traffic law is fully applied, you cant but feel that it is an ill-timed step… I mean let’s be honest, the majority of those who apply for a driving license show up on their test day to sign some papers and end up getting their license no matter how poor their knowledge about traffic laws is, and I really doubt most drivers are aware that you’re not supposed to stop the cars after the white bar on a red light. In fact, if you abide by this rule don’t be surprised to see people cutting you off and stopping in front of you…

The ultimate purpose for applying traffic rules is to reduce road accidents and avoid traffic jams. So it it were up to me, I would have allocated this project money to educate the masses and recruit additional police officers to ensure that the basic laws are applied. Till now, wherever you go in Beirut you see taxi cars and minibuses picking up passengers wherever they please on the road. Moreover, double parking is like norm everywhere… solving these two problems alone should guarantee making the traffic smoother all over the city. Let alone other problems caused by asshole motorbikers and pedestrians who insist on crossing the road no matter what color is the traffic light.

But then again, someone now thinks it is time to erect these cameras regardless of any other priorities, so brace yourselves, tickets are coming!

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New Parking Tariffs in Beirut

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Due to the disproportionate tariffs set by parking owners across Beirut, governor Ziad Chebib and the municipality recently issued a new decree setting the maximum fees you should pay for private parkings around the city after dividing it into 4 regions as shown above, and the new tariffs are as follows:

First region (Blue):

  • from 0 to 3 hours:
    3,000 L.L.
  • from 3 to 5 hours:
    4,000 L.L.
  • from 5 to 8 hours:
    5,000 L.L.
  • 8 to 10 hours:
    6,000 L.L.
  • from 10 to 14 hours:
    7,000 L.L.

Second region (Green):

  • from 0 to 4 hours:
    3,000 L.L.
  • from 4 to 7 hours:
    4,000 L.L.
  • from 7 to 10 hours:
    5,000 L.L.
  • from 10 to 14 hours:
    6,000 L.L.

Third region (Yellow):

  • from 0 to 3 hours:
    2,000 L.L.
  • from 3 to 5 hours:
    3,000 L.L.
  • from 5 to 8 hours:
    3,500 L.L.
  • from 8 to 10 hours:
    4,000 L.L.
  • from 10 to 14 hours:
    5,000 L.L.

Fourth region (Red):

  • from 0 to 4 hours:
    2,000 L.L.
  • from 4 to 7 hours:
    3,000 L.L.
  • from 7 to 10 hours:
    3,000 L.L.
  • from 10 to 14 hours:
    4,000 L.L.

As for covered parking spaces, the following tariffs apply:

First region (Blue):

  • from 0 to 3 hours:
    4,000 L.L.
  • from 3 to 5 hours:
    5,000 L.L.
  • from 5 to 8 hours:
    6,000 L.L.
  • from 8 to 10 hours
    7,000 L.L.
  • from 10 to 14 hours:
    8,000 L.L.

Second region (Green):

  • from 0 to 4 hours:
    4,000 L.L.
  • from 4 to 7 hours:
    5,000 L.L.
  • from 7 to 10 hours:
    6,000 L.L.
  • from 10 to 14 hours:
    7,000 L.L.

Third region (Yellow):

  • from 0 to 3 hours:
    3,000 L.L.
  • from 3 to 5 hours:
    3,500 L.L.
  • from 5 to 8 hours:
    4,000 L.L.
  • 8 to 10 hours:
    4,500 L.L.
  • from 10 to 14 hours:
    5,500 L.L.

Fourth region (Red):

  • from 0 to 4 hours:
    3,000 L.L.
  • from 4 to 7 hours:
    3,000 L.L.
  • from 7 to 10 hours:
    4,000 L.L.
  • from 10 to 14 hours
    4,500 L.L.

Note that the time is rounded up to the nearest hour after 10 minutes.

I’m not really sure how serious will the municipality be about obliging parking owners to abide by the set tariffs, but the chart will at least help you know whether you’re being ripped off or not!

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