Speeding radars in Lebanon – A profitable business

I was listening to the radio on my way to work today when I heard that the internal security forces issued a total of 5,000 tickets after 24 hours of activating the speeding radars.

Given that each ticket costs 50,000 L.L, a quick calculation shows that we now owe the Lebanese government a total of 250,000,000 L.L (~$166,000) in just one day! And at this rate, the government will be generating $5,000,000 a month from these radars!

Assuming that the cost of the radars + installing them is $10,000,000, it will take 2 months to cover this amount and start generating profit! Now that’s a business I wish I can invest in!

Still, I have some question marks about collecting these fines from violators. In a country like Lebanon where people can drive a car with defected number plates on their cars and still get away with it when going through the yearly car inspection, how will the police identify the car number in such case? And what about all these foreign cars with Khaliji number plates? Is there some mechanism to force their owners to pay the fines before leaving Lebanon?

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10 Responses to Speeding radars in Lebanon – A profitable business

  1. Archangelus November 9, 2010 at 11:50 am #

    Bkhsous el khaliji plate holders, well i guess they can freeze their amazon shopping cart accounts 😛 at list their Wish list !

  2. Archangelus November 9, 2010 at 11:55 am #

    @Archangelus
    *at least (ektada el tawdi7)

  3. Basheer November 9, 2010 at 12:02 pm #

    Let’s be honest here… we the Lebanese drivers are most to blame for the current situation. If those with Lebanese plates started to respect traffic regulations, the overall situation would be considerably better. But then if we respected the law, this would no longer be Lebanon. Enter Switzerland.

  4. Simon November 9, 2010 at 1:27 pm #

    I’m all for enforcing speeding limits on the roads and all, but the speed limits in lebanon are ridiculous!

    Wats with the 40K/hr speed limit? we only have them here (sydney, australia) during school time (8am to 9:30am, and 2:30 to 4pm) and only near a school zone. Everywhere else it’s 50 or 60. mini highways is 70, and major highways 110.

  5. Sareen November 9, 2010 at 3:03 pm #

    @Simon
    I heard that as a rule of thumb, it’s 50 km on the inside roads and 100 km on the highways. (Not 100% sure about it tho)

  6. Rami November 9, 2010 at 3:56 pm #

    Sareen :

    @Simon
    I heard that as a rule of thumb, it’s 50 km on the inside roads and 100 km on the highways. (Not 100% sure about it tho)

    True, unless the maximum speed is explicitly indicated by a sign.

    @Simon
    This sign is just a random photos from the internet, however there are some signs in Beirut that set 40Km/h as the maximum speed.

  7. Rami November 9, 2010 at 3:57 pm #

    @Archangelus
    Oh that would hurt! 😛 They better pay the fines lakan!

  8. Serpico November 9, 2010 at 8:08 pm #

    @Simon
    Not long time ago, the speed limit in Downtown Montreal has become 40km/h.

  9. Charbel November 24, 2010 at 3:06 pm #

    With these $ 5 millions, we can illuminate our roads with 10,000 solar road lightening, for an average of $ 500 /solar system (including the panels and the lapms).
    Or we can even install 35,000 solar traffic lights for approx $ 150/pc

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